Thursday, January 05, 2006

Introducing myself to readers who may not know me

For my readers who may not know me or may know little about me, perhaps it would be helpful if I were to offer a brief vita to give some indications of my diverse interests. Serving as a professor of biblical studies in an undergraduate institution tends to constrain one to engage a broader range of subjects than if one were a professor in a graduate theological school. I have taught at both levels. Teaching graduate theological studies required a narrower focus for me.

The broader demand of undergraduate studies suits my interests well. I believe it makes me a more well-rounded thinker. All my work in the biblical text has a theological interest, as a result. "What does it matter?" is a question that I always engage in all my work in the biblical text. If I do not move toward answering this question, my work would be significantly short-sighted and pointless.

Here, then, is a vita that reflects many of my interests biblically and theologically speaking.


I have been teaching at Northwestern College since 1992, when I joined the faculty after having taught at Trinity International University (Deerfield, Illinois) and at Grace Theological Seminary (Winona Lake, Indiana).


Education:

  • Advanced Studies, Jerusalem University College, Jerusalem, Israel.

  • Ph.D., Theological Studies— New Testament Exegesis and Theology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois.

  • Th.M., Theology— Systematic Theology with a New Testament Concentration, Grace Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana.

  • M.Div., Pastoral Studies— Biblical Exegesis Concentration, Grace Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana.

  • B.A., History, Bryan College, Dayton, Tennessee.



Selected Publications:

  • “Is Theological Truth Functional or Propositional? Postconservatism’s Use of Language Games and Speech-Act Theory,” Reclaiming the Center: Evangelical Accommodation in a Post-Theological Era, edited by Millard J. Erickson, Justin Taylor, and Paul Kjoss Helseth. Wheaton: Crossway, 2004.


  • “Christ’s Baptism and Crucifixion as Anointing and Enthronement of God’s Son: Narrative Significance of Ironic Inclusio in Mark’s Gospel,” The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology, 8:3 (Fall 2004).


  • “Forum Discussion on Race and Racism,” The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology, 8:2 (Summer 2004).


  • “Sacred Imagination and the Gospel: A Review of ‘The Passion of the Christ’” on two internet sites: Bible.org and Minnesota Apologetics Project.


  • “Keeping an Open Mind: How Open Theists Interpret the Bible,” Areopagus Journal 4:2 (2004): 14-18.


  • "When Reading Is Better Than Being There: Following Jesus by Hearing His Voice in the Gospels," Miqra, 2:4 (Fall 2003).


  • "Veiled Glory: God's Self-Revelation in Human Likeness--A Biblical Theology of God's Anthropomorphic Self-Disclosure," pages 149-199 in Beyond the Bounds: Open Theism and the Undermining of Biblical Christianity, ed. John Piper, Justin Taylor, Paul Kjoss Helseth. Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2003.


  • “Critical Comments on an Open Theism Manifesto,” Trinity Journal 23 NS (2002): 103-107.


  • Review of The Way of Wisdom: Essays in Honor of Bruce K. Waltke. Edited by J. I. Packer and Sven K. Soderlund. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000, 332 pp., $29.99 cloth, in Reformation & Revival Journal 11:2 (2002).


  • The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance and Assurance (Downers Grove, Illinois: Inter-Varsity, 2001). Co-authored with my good friend, Tom Schreiner, Professor of New Testament, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.


  • "God in the Image and Likeness of Adam--Clark Pinnock's Use of Scripture in His Argument: 'God Limits His Knowledge,'" Journal of Biblical Apologetics, 2 (2001): 20-27.


  • "How Can a Sinner Be Saved?" Review of Getting the Gospel Right: The Tie that Binds Evangelicals Together by R. C. Sproul, in Modern Reformation 10:3 (May-June, 2001): 43-45.


  • "The Implausible God of Open Theism: A Response to Gregory A. Boyd's God of the Possible," Journal of Biblical Apologetics, 1 (2000): 66-87.


  • “Alpha and Omega,” “Branch,” “Sleep,” “Sign,” in Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).


  • “Putting God at Risk: A Critique of John Sanders’ View of Providence,” Trinity Journal 20 (1999): 131-163.


  • “Mark’s Provocative Use of Scripture in Narration: ‘He Was with the Wild Animals and Angels Ministered to Him,’” Bulletin for Biblical Research 9 (1999): 19-36.


  • “He Wrote in Parables and Riddles: Mark’s Gospel as a Literary Reproduction of Jesus’ Teaching Method,” Didaskalia 10:2 (1999): 35-67.


  • “‘Evangelical Inclusivism’ and the Exclusivity of the Gospel: A Review of John Sanders’ No Other Name: The Destiny of the Unevangelized, The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology 1:4 (1997): 24-39.


  • “Redeemed from the Curse of the Law”: The Use of Deut 21:22-23 in Gal 3:13,” Trinity Journal NS 10 (1989): 185-209.


  • “Qoheleth: Enigmatic Pessimist or Godly Sage?” Grace Theological Journal 7 (1986): 21-56.




Selected Recent Papers Presented at Professional Meetings:

  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, November 16-18, 2005— "The Ox and the Man: Law as Wisdom?"


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the the Upper Midwest Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, Luther Seminary, Saint Paul, Minnesota: April 1-2, 2005– “'They exchanged the glory of God for the immage of man'–Echoes of Adam and of Israel in Romans 1:21-25"


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Upper Midwest Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, Luther Seminary, Saint Paul, Minnesota: April 2004— “'Christ has become a servant of the circumcision on behalf of God’s truthfulness'—Jesus as Isaiah’s Servant of the Lord in Romans 15:8?"


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Midwest Region of the Evangelical Theological Society, Northwestern College, Saint Paul, Minnesota: March 2003— "Veiled Glory: God's Self-Revelation in Human Likeness--A Biblical Theology of God's Anthropomorphic Self-Disclosure."


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Midwest Region of the Evangelical Theological Society, College Church, Wheaton, Illinois: March 2002— "'Save Yourself and The People Who Hear You:' Preaching the Bible’s Admonitions and Warnings for Christians to Persevere."


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Opryland Hotel, Nashville, Tennessee: November 2000— God Revealed in Human Form: Biblical Foundations for Theology.


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Danvers, Mass.: November 1999— Belief, Doing Good, and Resurrection unto Eternal Life: Divine Judgment Now and Not Yet–The Structure and Function of Eschatology in John 5:24-30.


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Orlando, FL: November 1998— “He Wrote in Parables and Riddles: Mark’s Gospel as a Literary Reproduction of Jesus’ Teaching Method.” (Published in Didaskalia, see above.)


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Upper Midwest Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, Saint Paul, MN: April 1997— “Mark’s Provocative Use of Scripture in Narration: ‘He was with the wild animals and angels ministered to him.’” (Published in the Bulletin for Biblical Research, see above.)


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Jackson, MS: November 1996— “Luke’s Use of the Filling and Fullness Metaphor Concerning the Holy Spirit.”


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Upper Midwest Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, Saint Paul, MN: April 1996— “Mark’s Inclusio as a Supra-Framing Device.”


  • Read at Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Philadelphia, PA: November, 1995— “Galatians 3:22ff as a Crux Interpretum for PISTIS CRISTOU in Paul’s Thought.”



Professional Memberships:

  • Institute for Biblical Research

  • Evangelical Theological Society

  • Society of Biblical Literature

  • Center of the American Experiment

  • National Association of Scholars

  • Minnesota Association of Scholars

  • Intercollegiate Studies Institute

  • Theta Alpha Kappa

The Race Set Before Us


Thomas R. Schreiner and A. B. Caneday, The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance and Assurance. InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, Illinois. 2001.



Advisory Roles at Northwestern College:

  • Advisor & Coordinator of Alpha Zeta Omicron, the local chapter of Theta Alpha Kappa, National Honor Society for Religious Studies & Theological Studies

  • Campus Representative and Faculty Associate member of Intercollegiate Studies Institute



Service to Other Organizations:

  • Associate Editor, Reformation & Revival Journal, Reformation & Revival Ministries, Carol Stream, Illinois

4 comments:

Jorge Afanador said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Paulos said...

Jorge,

I'm sorry that I missed your note.

Do you know Dr. Siu? Greet him for me. We met at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School during our Ph.D. studies.

I would suggest that you take a look at Wheaton Graduate School, which offers a Ph.D. TEDS offers a Ph.D. in theological studies with a concentration in OT, NT, Historical Theology, or Systematic Theology.

I would suggest looking at other programs, too, such as Duke University, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, St. Andrews. Also check out Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville. For evangelicals, the options are many more than when I was looking for a Ph.D. program.

Blessings!

Jorge Afanador said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Paulos said...

Jorge,

I should have said Princeton Seminary.

The difference that one's choice makes between an evangelical graduate school or a secular one is primarily where you want to end up. To teach at most evangelical colleges or seminaries one can take a Ph.D. from either an evangelical or a secular graduate school. To teach, however, at a secular institution would almost invariably require a Ph.D. from a secular school. In other words, one's teaching prospects are wider, if one takes a Ph.D. from a non-evangelical graduate school.

So, in my estimation, one needs to determine where one wants to teach after receiving the Ph.D. before one matriculates in any Ph.D. program.